My year with Android via Nexus 5

A year ago, I was ready for a change. I was tired of my tiny iPhone screen and the off-contract cost of AT&T cell service, so I switched to a Google Nexus 5 with a nice screen and T-Mobile with friendly and cheaper month-to-month service. But now I’m back to a iPhone and AT&T. The size problem has been fixed with the iPhone 6, though it’s still a little smaller than the Nexus 5, and my AT&T service is now employer subsidized. AT&T has also adapted to offering more T-Mobile-like plans.

Reasons I was looking to change back to iPhone/AT&T:

  • Battery life was terrible for my Nexus 5. It would barely make it 10 hours in sleep mode. I can only imagine that my cell/wifi reception was so poor that the phone was constantly waking up and looking for a better connection.
  • Poor T-Mobile coverage in this area. Too many places, I had no data coverage.
  • Android was not as convenient to sync with my Mac (iTunes/iPhoto). However, now I see iTunes and iPhoto aren’t as convenient as they used to be if you don’t opt in to the cloud sharing.
  • I missed having a hardware mute switch for the entire phone. Android has several different volume settings and muting one (like ringer volume) doesn’t mute the others (like app noise volume).

Things I will miss from Nexus/Android:

  • Convenient integration with Google Now. I get most of the functionality from the Google iOS app, but it’s not as convenient or as tightly integrated as on Android. Surprisingly often, it would tell me what I needed to know before I asked.
  • T-Mobile customer service. The fact that it was easy to cancel is a good sign in itself. Also, when we went to Toronto last summer, T-Mobile prompted me to buy a short-term international data plan (about $20), while my wife’s AT&T phone silently accumulated $100s in international roaming charges, and she thought she had cellular data turned off.
  • Openness of the app store, including being able to use Firefox and ad blockers.

One bonus of the switch-back is that my old iPhone apps carried over from before. Perhaps the downside of the open Google Play store is there is more a focus on in-app ads instead of paid apps. The ad-based Scrabble was unusable (a fullscreen ad after every move), so I’m happy to get back to my paid, ad-free Scrabble app on iOS.

One more thing: for some reason the iOS Google Maps app doesn’t show traffic as well as the Android version. These two screen captures are showing about the same thing before my morning commute, but the iOS version on the left puts the blue “your route” line over the red “slow traffic” lines, making it hard to see the traffic along your route.